WASHINGTON

RISS Center- WSIN

Washington Leadership for WSIN

In addition to federal monitoring, WSIN is governed by a Board of Directors composed of state and local representatives from each participating state. In Washington, these leadership positions are held by the following WSIN Board members:

Chief John R. Batiste
Washington State Patrol
210 11th Avenue, SW
Olympia, WA 98504
(360) 586-2355

Chief Ken Thomas
Kent Police Department
220 Fourth Avenue South
Kent, WA 98032
(253) 856-5800

WSIN and RISS a Key to Combating Human Trafficking

As part of the nationwide RISS network, WSIN delivers valuable products and services to assist law enforcement personnel in investigating and prosecuting major crimes, including those involving human trafficking organizations, at no cost.

RISS Criminal Intelligence Database (RISSIntel)—RISSIntel is a trusted database that connects law enforcement agencies regionally and throughout the nation that are investigating the same subjects involved in major crimes, including human trafficking. A key feature of RISSIntel is that it is not simply a “human trafficking database.” RISSIntel is a database that contains subjects for which there is criminal predicate relating to a multitude of crimes, thereby allowing law enforcement officers to “connect the dots” between the gang members and/or drug traffickers, who are also engaging in human and/or sex trafficking.

RISSafe Watch Center—RISSafe provides human trafficking task forces with a means to avoid blue-on-blue conflicts when they conduct surveillance, serve a search/arrest warrant, or perform other operations. RISSafe events are monitored on a 24/7/365 basis by personnel in a watch center. This ensures that law enforcement officers are continuously supported with immediate access to the RISSIntel database and RISSafe deconfliction and receive immediate notification of conflicts.

Specialized Equipment Program—WSIN loans a variety of specialized and custombuilt covert equipment to assist law enforcement officers in pursuing human trafficking and other criminal organizations.

Analytical Support—WSIN’s analytical assistance enhances investigations by organizing the information developed and presenting a variety of visual products that demonstrate the breadth of the human trafficking enterprise: the key players, including pimps, johns, recruiters, and victims; the geographical scope of the criminal organization; communication between key subjects; and chronological incidents.

In FY2017—

315 Member Agencies
4,212 Access Officers
49,200 Intelligence Database Inquiries
15,844 Intelligence Database Hits
6,008 RISS Officer Safety Event Deconfliction System
(RISSafe) Events Submitted
350,836 Bulletins Disseminated
45,215,465 Law Enforcement Database Records Available Nationwide

Benton County Metro Task Force
RISSIntel

The Benton County Metro Task Force (BCMTF) posted an address in RISSafe for a buy/walk operation. A suspect’s name, date of birth (DOB), and a Washington driver’s license was searched and stored in RISSIntel. A hit was identified with the Medford, Oregon Area Drug and Gang Enforcement Team (MADGE). MADGE had stored the suspect under a different name, with an alias. The alias name and the DOB matched the BCMTF’s inquiry. It unknown that this individual had a different name reported through Oregon. The task force officer was put in contact with the MADGE and they collaborated further on the case.

Testimonials

“The link chart and timeline look great! I really appreciate all of your efforts in helping us out.”

—Des Moines Police Department

“The connection between the undercover buys and the command and control structure of the drug trafficking organization would not have been found without the MCP.”

—Law Enforcement Against Drugs

The Regional Information Sharing Systems (RISS) mission is to assist local, state, federal, and tribal criminal justice agencies by providing adaptive solutions and services that facilitate information sharing, support criminal investigations, and promote officer safety.

The Western States Information Network (WSIN), one of the six RISS Centers, began providing service to its regional participating agencies in 1981. WSIN’s region consists of:

  • Alaska
  • California
  • Hawaii
  • Oregon
  • Washington
  • Parts of Canada, Guam, and New Zealand

Since 1981, the number of law enforcement and criminal justice agencies benefiting from WSIN services has grown to include 1,552 agencies.

www.riss.net/Impact

Law Enforcement Against Drugs
RISS Money Counter Project (MCP)

The Law Enforcement Against Drugs (LEAD) Task Force in Sunnyside purchased a money counter that was used to photograph currency and document currency information, such as serial number, denomination, and currency type. The LEAD money counter was connected to the RISS MCP database to upload the case information. The MCP database also stores all currency-based case information for law enforcement agencies. Using the MCP allowed LEAD to compare its case information with all of the records stored in the MCP database nationwide.

The LEAD Task Force reported that another recent investigation involving the importation of significant quantities of heroin and methamphetamine into Washington resulted in the seizure of over one million dollars of illicit funds. The money was recorded in the MCP database and was instrumental in accurately documenting the seizure, saving countless man-hours, which would have normally been required to hand-count the money. The LEAD detective stated that the MCP has been a huge success for the task force, making the LEAD Task Force much more effective.

Drug Enforcement Administration
RISSIntel

A special agent with the Seattle Division of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) searched RISSIntel for a target and received four hits (two in Washington and two in Oregon). One specific hit on an address was from a case submitted from a High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Task Force. The DEA special agent was put in contact with the HIDTA Task Force, and they collaborated further on the case. The DEA special agent stated that collaborating with the other agency saved him from doing duplicate work and provided him with additional information on his target.